Review: The Televangelist

Ibrahim Essa’s new novel, The Televangelist, is a powerful commentary on Islam in modern Egypt with deep insight for Westerners. Nothing is what it seems. The last few pages of the book will surprise you so much you’ll want to read them again to see how it all plays out.

Sheik Hatem is a televangelist for a popular call-in show based in Cairo. When he is tasked with turning a high-profile leader’s son back from his conversion to Christianity, he finds himself in the middle of a high-stakes mission that risks his position with the state in its tight control over religious media. Due to his prestige and willingness to engage his fans in an approachable way, he becomes the reader’s intermediary in a complex Islamic context…

 

Here is my review of The Televangelist published at the Washington Independent Review of Books on 27 September 2016:

http://www.washingtonindependentreviewofbooks.com/bookreview/the-televangelist-a-novel

Review: The Castaway’s War

Check out my most recent review at the Washington Independent Review of Bookshttp://www.washingtonindependentreviewofbooks.com/bookreview/the-castaways-war-one-mans-battle-against-imperial-japanscreen-shot-2016-09-08-at-11-37-11-am

Meet the Press: May 2016

Hoopoe Specializes in Stories from the Middle East and North Africa.

Published in the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Excerpt:

Discover the Arab world’s most dynamic novels now available in English thanks to Hoopoe — from the American University in Cairo (AUC) Press — a new imprint spotlighting Arab novels, the kind that already top the stacks on nightstands across the Middle East.

Click here for the article.

Mormon is Global, 2nd Edition

My copies finally arrived in the mail today!

_2 - 1 (1)

 

What’s new?

  • Refined nearly every page.
  • An East to West discussion.
  • Immigration/Converts
  • Clarification of some chapters/ideas.

“The problem with associating Mormonism and Americanism is that people expect Mormons to behave like Americans.” p.8

“The spark lit in the first edition began burning for a second. Thanks to colleagues, friends and family for feedback that nuances and enlivens this new edition. I still do not consider this a definitive volume but an evolving process to disguss an intricate global network of Mormons while acknowledging challenges and obstacles….” p.6

“Karthik Thandavamurthy wouldn’t mind signing an autograph, especially for a couple of twinkle under lovely loppy lashes. Karthik is Mormon. He’s Indian from Bangalaru. He’s Deaf. He also loves working with Mormon missionaries to translate for other deaf Indians interested in learning more about the Mormons.

This is what it looks like….” p.31

“My roommate in Jerusalem was a convert. Four of us roomed together in Brigham Young University’s Jerusalem campus set on a lovely hill overlooking the Old City on the West Bank. She was the first convert with whom I had close interaction. I was eighteen and impressionable. She took it as her mission to open my eyes to the outside world. Mormons, she felt, were too sheltered.” p.44

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